Angie Chen

Bio:

I’m a senior from Martel studying C.S. with a minor in Entrepreneurship. I first got into tech because I’m fascinated by its societal impact and wanted to better understand the thing that impacts every aspect of our lives today. Originally from the Chicago suburbs, I’ll be moving to Seattle (finally, some mountains!) after graduation to be a PM at Microsoft. These days, in my free time I enjoy going for walks/runs in Herman Park, hosting weekly Bachelorette watch parties at Martel, and (trying) to read more books.

L’s Taken

“Thank you for taking the time to apply, but…”

  • Google (4 times)
  • Airbnb
  • Facebook
  • Uber
  • Lyft
  • Tableau

Regrets I have

  • Not getting more involved in the entrepreneurship scene at Rice
  • Not taking my mental health more seriously earlier in college

Things I swore I’d finish but never did

  • Establishing a consistent workout routine
  • Pretty much every book I’ve opened the past 3 years
  • My bullet journal
  • Andrew Ng’s Coursera course on AI/ML

Everyday L’s

  • Accidental 5-hr naps
  • Having a mental breakdown on the morning of my 21st birthday because of ChatApp
  • Basically all of COMP 182 and 382

On the Bright Side

Memories made when I wasn’t studying/working

  • Sitting in an H-Mart parking lot eating dumplings with my O-Week kids
  • Sleeping on church floors, cooking for ourselves, and meeting some really inspirational people on my freshman year ASB about environmental justice
  • The late night weekend Velvet Taco runs
  • Traveling to NYC and Austin with friends
  • Solo trips to the MFAH for self-care

Things I’ve learned that will still matter in 10 years

  • You are capable of doing so much more than you give yourself credit for.
  • Getting enough sleep will do wonders for your happiness and productivity.
  • It’s important to continually question whether a certain job or field is right for you so that you do what truly fulfills you, and not just what everyone else around you is doing.

Things I’ve done that have pushed me out of my comfort zone

  • Leading RemixCS through Covid and completely changing the way the program is structured and run
  • Co-advising at Wiess

Leaps of faith

  • Switching from SWE to PM so early in my career
  • Sticking with CS even though I consider myself more of a social science person
  • Living in SF for a whole summer with people I didn’t know super well (it worked out great :))

Obstacles overcome

  • Unlearning that self-worth and value comes from accomplishments.
  • Dealing with leadership imposter syndrome (tbh, still working on this one)

Life changing advice I’ve received

  • The walls around you don’t actually exist. The person who said this meant that the biggest obstacles to our own success and happiness are the perceived constraints that we, and not anyone else, have placed on ourselves.

--

--

--

Learn more about us at http://csclub.rice.edu/ Submit your own story here https://tinyurl.com/rrzkpaf

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

If you’ve loved and lost…

Why My #1 Piece of Advice Is “Keep Going”

Not Everyone Will Join You

The Tyranny of “Special”: Why You Should Give Up Being Special and Try on Being Unique

The World Sees Me as A Scholar?

3 Extremely Important Things to Remember When Someone Dies

Are you responsible for your life?

Build Margin Into Your Life For a Satisfying Retirement

A woman thinking of the future

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Rice CS Club

Rice CS Club

Learn more about us at http://csclub.rice.edu/ Submit your own story here https://tinyurl.com/rrzkpaf

More from Medium

Quell is Back with Faster and More Intuitive Caching.

Harness the Secret to Be Anything You Want to Be —  A Simple Framework for Life

3 Simple exercises to build that Empathy Muscle

Project 1B : Challenging your problem solving skills to accept failure